Dating and violence

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These documents draw from various studies that use different measures. More than 1 in 5 women and nearly 1 in 7 men who have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner first experienced some form of intimate partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age (CDC, 2011).In a survey of 500 teen and young adults, 57% percent waited six months or more before seeking any help while 40% hadn’t talked to anyone about abusive behavior in their relationship (Mary Kay, 2014).Broadly defined as a pattern of abuse or threat of abuse against teenaged dating partners, TDV occurs across diverse groups and cultures.Although the dynamics of TDV are similar to adult domestic violence, the forms and experience of TDV as well as the challenges in seeking and providing services make the problem of TDV unique.The fact sheet also presents data that suggests the association between forced sexual intercourse and risky behaviors.This fact sheet presents information about dating and domestic violence among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) young people and the obstacles faced by LGBTQ youth in seeking help.In a healthy relationship, both partners take responsibility for their own happiness, never expecting their partner to make them happy.So, how do you know if your relationship is healthy?

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In a relationship, you may experience new feelings and emotions.This document examines the prevalence of dating violence by gender and communities of color.The document also presents information about the different types of dating violence and their effects on teens who experience dating violence.A healthy relationship requires communication, honesty, trust, and respect from each partner.Equality and balance go hand-in-hand in a healthy relationship, where each dating partner recognizes and supports the other’s choices, individuality and beliefs.

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