Face recognition dating

Rated 4.20/5 based on 777 customer reviews

Tech giants like Facebook and Google have most likely amassed the largest face data sets, which they do not distribute, according to research papers.

But other companies and universities have widely shared their image troves with researchers, governments and private enterprises in Australia, China, India, Singapore and Switzerland for training artificial intelligence, according to academics, activists and public papers.

And while names are typically not attached to the photos, individuals can be recognized because each face is unique to a person. also spent more than a decade using such systems to compare driver’s license and visa photos against the faces of suspected criminals, according to a Government Accountability Office report last month.

Questions about the data sets are rising because the technologies that they have enabled are now being used in potentially invasive ways. On Wednesday, a congressional hearing tackled the government’s use of the technology. Activists and others said they were angered by the possibility that people’s likenesses had been used to build ethically questionable technology and that the images could be misused.

The databases are pulled together with images from social networks, photo websites, dating services like Ok Cupid and cameras placed in restaurants and on college quads.

While there is no precise count of the data sets, privacy activists have pinpointed repositories that were built by Microsoft, Stanford University and others, with one holding over 10 million images while another had more than two million.

The face compilations are being driven by the race to create leading-edge facial recognition systems.

SAN FRANCISCO — Dozens of databases of people’s faces are being compiled without their knowledge by companies and researchers, with many of the images then being shared around the world, in what has become a vast ecosystem fueling the spread of facial recognition technology.The same goes for when we tested out photos of ourselves in the Buzz Feed office: The matches weren’t dead ringers, but there was some vague approximation of uncanny similarity.I tested two different photos of myself making different expressions in different light, and both times it picked the same 35-year-old woman from Long Island who does kinda look like me as one of my top matches.Ahrens and his business partner would only say that they are looking forward to working with the dating apps; Tinder, Match, and Plenty of Fish tell a different story.For now, the app is still up in the app store and still pulling Tinder profiles.

Leave a Reply